S I Joint Pain

Sat Nov 14,2015

Low back pain? Hip pain? Sciatica?  These are probably the most common pain complaints out there.  I have seen figures where as much as 80% of the western population has some form of these pain issues.  Why?

There are many reasons: weight gain, muscle imbalance, poor posture, joint dysfunction, joint defects, injury, repetitive movement patterns, arthritis, lack of movement/exercise and the list goes on and on.  For me…a lot of my back issues are that pesky S I joint.  My S I joint will rotate out of position slightly…usually on the right side and here come the muscle tightness and/or that slight hip pain or numb-like feeling in my quad.  

The sacroiliac joint connects the sacrum with the pelvis on either side of the lower spine. It moves the forces of the upper body to the pelvis and legs.                                                                                                                    

  
The saccrum and S I joint (it’s all connected) has to hold all the weight from our upper body and transfer that weight to our pelvis and legs.  This is why posture is so important…when all that weight (force) is transfered…the pelvis, hips, legs and feet (heels) should be supporting the weight in a balanced manner.  If not well balanced…over time all kinds of mechanical and postural problems will occur.  Those problems progress without treatment.  

When the body works out of postion it creates stress on the joints, and excess tension on the muscles.  When these positions are repeated constantly…the constant stress on the joints and excessive muscular tension…lead to inflammation, bone spurs, spasms, tendinitis, ligament damage and more.  A pill, a shot, some rest will ease symptoms…but, the cause needs to addressed!  Learn how to correct posture problems and repeated poor movement patterns.

If you have any of these pain issues…address them.  I did 12 years ago.  I only did because I hurt so bad I believed I was not going to be able to be active much longer…I was only 45.  Thank goodness I did something about it….today I am pretty much pain free and can move freely…actually as good as I ever have.

It started with massage and chiropractic care.  Two years ago I added FOUNDATION TRAINING!  Foundation Training has been the ultimate treatment for me.  To be able to lengthen my posterior chain…then to strengthen those muscles while in a lengthened position has been eye opening!  This is what has been missing all my years of working out, training and competitive sports.  Not only that…Foundation Training is the ultimate core work.  I mean pelvic floor core work….the real deal!

Gotta go…fixing to get my walk, FT work and a little floor work in.  Then I’ll teach a little FT.

Have a great weekend folks!

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POOR POSTURE HAS MANY SIDE EFFECTS

Posture workshop Sat May 16, 9:30 at Flowood YMCA.  Make plans to be there.  Posture picture will be taken, a few stretches/exercises will be given and some decompression breathing will be taught.  You can be on your way to reducing pain issues and improving your health.  Feel free to bring anyone who could benefit.

Cost: 20.00 for Y members.    30.00 for non members.       

   We are often commanded to “stop slouching” and understand this to be a bad habit. But do you know why?

 Poor posture creates several repercussions – both physically and mentally. In this article, I aim to shed some light on the topic and explain why we should pay attention to our posture and how to reverse the slouch.

 

 

Poor Posture Is Exhausting

Our brain is busy making sense of the data it collects in our over-stimulating environments. Lights, sounds, smells, terrain all require a part of our brain to process and guide our actions. Mental stimulation has benefits, but too much is taxing on both our brain and postural alignment.

 

Applying muscular strength to sit or stand tall and lengthen upward with our torso requires both mental and physical energy. Without adequate mental downtime, our muscles fatigue. This compromises alignment and postural integrity. When we are well rested, strong and flexible, we remain more upright, with good spinal extension. Our ribcage broadens, torso lengthens and taking deep, full breaths becomes easier without the weighty restrictions of anterior collapse compressing into our lungs.

 

The Anatomy of Poor Posture

When we slouch, our head juts forward and tilts down, flexing anterior neck muscles and over stretching trapezius, splenius, and longissimus. Blood, nerve innervation, and airflow become labored. Vertebrae can be easily pulled out of alignment, creating curvature imbalances along the spine and in some cases causing nerve impingement.

 

“Nerves in our neck, collarbones, torso, between the ribs, and through our core can become impinged, lessening their ability to relay signals between our brain and body.”

The pectoralis major, pectoralis minor, subclavius, and sternalis muscles become hypertonic (excessively strong) and pull shoulder blades forward with an anterior rotation in the upper arm bones. This causes the sternum and chest to pull inward toward the front spine and down toward the pelvis. This adds more pressure on the diaphragm and inhibits its ability for an unrestricted inhalation.

 

Nerves in our neck, collarbones, torso, between the ribs, and through our core can become impinged, lessening their ability to relay signals between our brain and body. The phrenic nerve is an important nerve branching off the spinal cord between the third and fifth cervical vertebrae. It runs along the neck and branches off to areas around the heart, pericardium, lungs, and diaphragm. It is the only nerve that supplies signals for our diaphragm to function.

 

                                                                                                                                                       


MORE MYO-FASCIAL RELEASE TECHNIQUES

Fri Jan 30, 2015
Morning! Hope everyone tried some of the release techniques I posted yesterday. I promise self myo-fascial release works…you just have to be consistent with it. In a lot of instances a person does not realize that have tightness in a certain area. For example, your hip could be hurting. It’s fine to roll the hip, but rolling the foot, calf, I T Band or hamstring could bring greater relief. Remember, our muscles should be working in better unison.
For today a few more body parts to work on.

QUADS
Using Trigger Point Quadballer or A FOAM ROLLER
1. Place the Quadballler just above your knee. 2. Lie down and prop yourself up on your forearms. Roll the Quadballer up and down your quad, stopping on any trigger points. Gently rock side-to-side. 3. In addition to rocking side-to-side on hot spots, bend your leg back at your knee. Hold for a few seconds. 4. Straighten your leg. Hold. Alternate bending and straightening your leg on your hot spots on your quad.

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1. Start with foam roller near your knee on the inside of your thigh. 2. Roll up towards your groin, stopping on any trigger points. 3. With the foam roller, you can go higher up your adductor than you can with a Quadballer. Repeat on other leg.
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IT Band
This is my favorite trigger point release exercise. If you run a lot, chances are you’ve experienced “runner’s knee.” Runner’s knee is caused by a tightening in your Iliotibial band, or IT band. The IT band is a thick band of fascia running on the side of your leg from your knee to your pelvis. Massaging your IT band can help loosen up tightness and prevent future injuries. Take it easy when you’re first starting out rolling your IT band. It’s going to hurt.

1. We’re going to roll the foam roller up and down the side of our leg starting at the top of the hip and down to just above the knee. 2. Lean back on your arm and bend your non-treated leg for added support. Roll up and down IT band, stopping on any hot spots. 3. If you really want to dig into those trigger points, lift both legs off the ground. Grimace. 4. In addition to applying steady pressure on hot spots, rock side-to-side on them. Repeat on other leg.

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There ya go. Foam rolling is uncomfortable but so worth it. Being able to treat yourself with these techniques will help keep you running, biking, playing tennis or whatever activity you do longer. Start rolling!. Also, if you do see a massage therapist it helps there work last long.

FOUNDATION TRAINING IS MEDICINE

Fri July 11,2014:
Whoo Hooo it’s finally Friday!
How many of your are chilling out at the house with a back ache?
How many of you are laid out on the couch with sore, tight muscles .
How many of you are going to do the yard work with these sore tight muscles?
How many of you are going to play golf or tennis tomorrow? Take a run? Sit all day at your child’s baseball/softball tournament?
How many of you have a such a bad back ache you won’t get up and doing anything tomorrow except take your pain pills?
It’s a shame to finally get thru the work week and get to the weekend then can barely enjoy it because all these pain issues.
It does not have to be like this!!!!! I understand completely. I have been in these situations many many times! So frustrating! All I can say is
Choose to stay frustrated or choose to feel good again! FOUNDATION TRAINING will make you feel good again! FOUNDATION TRAINING will free you from all those tight muscles and wake up that posterior chain. You will most likely feel better after one session.
Because of FOUNDATION TRAINING I will play golf Saturday and Sunday and do yard work…and I will not suffer afterwards either.
Contact me for an appointment. I welcome the opportunity to help you feel good again. FOUNDATION TRAINING works!
Also, you can click on the link to order the FT Book do DVD.
http://www.shareasale.com/r.cfm?B=619242&U=971056&M=51964&urllink=

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