REAL CORE WORK

Sat June 13,2015

I am meeting a friend today and introduce FOUNDATION TRAINING to him.  This person called me yesterday saying he hurt his back when he bent over to pick something up.  He went to a friend of his who is a doctor at a spine clinic.  He had X-rays and such done and the doctor tells him everything looks good…that this is a muscular problem.  The doctor tells him to strengthen his core!  The doctor also put him on muscle relaxers…Dern it!  I am glad my friend remembered our conversation 6 months ago when he had inquired what I had been up to.  I had briefly explained FOUNDATION TRAINING. 

First, what makes up the core?  This is important to know.  Most people think it he core are the abs…where the 6 pack is supposed to be.  The core is much more than the abdominal area.  The major muscle groups of the core consists of the diaphragm, transverse abdominus, multifidi, pelvic floor, internal & external obliques, erector spinae, and rectus abdominus.  The latissimus dorsi, glutei, and trapezius also are important components of the core.  All of the above mentioned muscles are located in and around the pelvis and stomach, back and ribcage area…front and back of the body.  

Now, that you know what the core is let me explain what FOUNDATION TRAINING does for the core.

FOUNDATION TRAINING will apply and anchoring technique coupled with a breathing technique which allows a person to decompress their own spine with all the musculature mentioned above.  This is called decompression breathing!  Decompression Breathing is a fabulous muscular way to breathe using the diaphragm, lengthen the spine creating space while bringing in healing oxygen, and really making the muscular contract, lift and expand. 

FOUNDATION TRAINING has a variety of exercises (pose positions) that wake up the core muscle group, the hamstrings, calves, feet, even the neck muscles.  If you will practice FOUNDATION TRAINING a little everyday all these muscles will start to lengthen, strengthen and work together.  Having all these muscle groups work together is vital to being strong and fit.

FOUNDATION TRAINING improves posture!  If a person is in good posture the muscles are working more effiecently because they are in a better position.  Good posture promotes proper joint position.   If the joints are in good position the move us around without pain and with less wear on tear on the joints.  Good posture is just flat out the only way we can have good mechanics in body movement.

FOUNDATION TRAINING just feels good!! Don’t get me wrong…FOUNDATION TRAINING is work…intense muscular work.  After a session you feel awesome.  All that oxygen coming in coupled with all the muscular contractions at once…then movement while in the lengthened state!  This is core work!  This is how you take care of your body!

FOUNDATION TRAINING teaches the individual awareness about their own body…which is awesome because we are all unique.  

FOUNDATION TRAINING improves breathing, posture, flexibility, mobility, stability, balance and decreases pain.  We need every one of these components to be healthy and fit.  We need every one of these components to move well and be well.  We need to move well now in order to age well.  After all, don’t we all want to age well and be as mobile as possible into our 60’s, 70’s and 80’s…. I sure do and I intend to with FOUNDATION TRAINING! 

HAMSTRINGS AND FOUNDATION TRAINING

Tue June 9,2015

Hamstrings- the muscle group in the upper back of the leg opposite our thigh.  The hamstring group is used to help us bend our knee and perform hip extension — backward movement of your thighs. Although the gluteal muscles in your buttocks are the main muscles that perform hip extension, your hamstrings assist with this motion as you move from sitting to standing, squat and jump. Hip extension performed by your hamstrings also helps propel your body forward as you run.

The hamstrings are often under utilized while the opposing muscle group (quads) are over utilized.  This creates imbalance.  The front of the legs becomes over dominate and the back of the leg becomes weak and looses its flexibility.   Too much sitting is another culprit for weak hamstrings and glutei.  If you are sitting on these muscles for 6-8 hours a day…they are not working!  If they are in this “turned off” state day after day, the hamstrings become short, tight and weak.  Hamstrings need to be flexible.  Tight hamstrings are a major contributor leading to back pain and knee pain.  

What can we do for our hamstrings?  

First, a steady diet of FOUNDATION TRAINING is a great place to start.  Foundation Training, is the perfect posterior chain training technique to stretch and strengthen the hamstrings.  If you want to keep doing the same old single leg hamstring stretches you have been doing for years…fine, but Foundation Training is better…and that’s a fact!  Isolated stretching is not going to accomplish what Foundation Training can do by stretching the whole posterior chain as a unit…period!  

Secondly, when working out at the gym for every quad exercise you do make sure you do a hamstring focused exercise.  Squats and deadlifts are ideal…if properly done.  If you know Foundation Training…you will be mechanically prepared to do squats and deadlifts properly.

Thirdly, stop,sitting all the time!  Get out of the chair and move around.  I have a desk job and I get up every 15 minutes or so.  I’ll throw in a little desk stretch or founder.  When I get home I’ll sit on the floor just to get my hips into a full range of motion.  

Work on your posture.  The hamstrings also help us balance our bodies.  If they are weak or tight we tend to bend at the waist and tip forward…this is how the back issues start…and never stop.   What’s the best exercise for posture?  That’s right…FOUNDATION TRAINING!  

Gain control of your body again.  Don’t let time, age and gravity bend you up like a pretzel.  FOUNDATION TRAINING will give you the awareness and tools you need to stand up tall, manage pain, move well and feel well.

FOUNDATION TRAINING IS A WAKE UP CALL

Mon June 8,2015

Here we are again on a Monday morning.  How many of us are waking up sore and tired from our weekend warrior activities?  How many of us are off to the gym this week to train our chest, biceps and quads?  How many of us will head off to our “desk” job and sit for most of the week?  How many ladies out there will high heeled shoes on all week?  How many of you have poor posture?  How many of you with back problems have been told to work on your core?

The point I am making from the above questions is how dominant we are in the front of our bodies.  The quads, chest, forefoot and biceps take the brunt of the workload in any given day.  Wearing a heeled shoe tips us forward loading the forefoot and quads.  We will make adjustments in most cases by arching the back…now we have extra forces on the discs.  Couple that with sitting at a desk…well this is a recepe for muscular imbalance and pain issues.

How many of you spend time…quality time on the back of the body?  This is where the most important muscles are.  The posterior muscles groups.  The body needs this group of muscles strong and flexible in order for them to do their job…which is to keep us upright, in good posture and balanced.

The term posterior chain refers to the series of muscles that include the low back, the glutes, the hamstrings, and even the calf muscles. Posterior chain exercises involve most, if not all, of these muscles in a chainlike manner.  Posterior chain exercises also contribute to a strong core. A common assumption is that the term core applies only to the abdominal muscles, but the low back, glutes, and even the top of the hamstrings are all part of the core as well. This back side of the core must also be developed and maintained.

If you are complaining that your back hurts or your shoulder hurts…chances are there is weakness in the back of the body somewhere.  That weakness is most likely coming from tightness in the front of the body.  This is what imbalance in the body is.   In most cases the front of the body is pulling the body forward couple that with forces of gravity pushing on us daily…no wonder so many people have back problems, disc degeneration, joints with worn out ligaments, and just overall compressed bad posture!

Learn FOUNDATION TRAINING!   The absolute best wake up call for posterior training there is.  The absolute best wake up call for you to learn about your body and how it works.  Once you gain a little knowledge about your postural habits…you can start to feel better.  FOUNDATION TRAINING is medicine, muscular work and therapy for the body all wrapped into one superb training technique.

It your body and your health.  The better you take care of your body…the better your body will work for you!

Contact me: steveygaddis@yahoo.com

Contact me today…steveygaddis.com

COULD YOUR GLUTES BE THE CAUSE OF YOUR PAIN?

Mon 11/17/14:
So many of us have back pain, knee pain, weak ankles. Why do we have these issues? Granted, if you have suffered a trauma or have been playing a sport and blew the knee there is your reason. I am talking to the everyday person who goes to work, takes care of the family and may or may not exercise. I can pretty much bet you have weak glutei and improper movement patterns.
The glutei are very large and strong muscles. The glutei have multi function roles…stabilization and extension. The glutei support our frame when standing and being mobile. The glutei work with our hip, pelvis,hamstrings to helps us do a number of daily life activities and powerful athletic activities. The glutei work with our back muscles to stabilize our spine and provide protection to our spine.
Having a weak glute is a formula for weakness and injury in our body. Weak glutei is a leading cause to low back pain. If you keep pulling your hamstring it could be your glutei is weak and your hamstring is doing too much work.
How do our glutei get weak? SITTING! In this day and age the average person spends way to much time sitting. After all, we do have to go to work… If you have a desk job you are most likely sitting 6 of the 8 hours you are there.
How do we solve the problem and start working on our glutei? We just flat out have to move more. Get up from the desk during the day. Talk a quick walk during lunch. Learn Foundation Training. FT will focus on the posterior chain and help strengthen the glutei. Learn to squat properly. Learn to do a single leg dead lift. All these exercise involve the glutei, hips pelvis and hamstrings. All of us need these muscles groups to work properly! Even more so as we age. These muscle groups will help prevent falls keep us moving, reduce bone issues, and keep us in our homes and not the assisted living facility.
Learn FOUNDATION TRAINING and get that posterior chain activated!

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WHY CAN’T WE HINGE OUR HIPS ANYMORE?

Monday 10/13/14:
Good morning everyone! Wanted to share a little about some of the new clients I have just started. First of all the majority of them are over 65. I think this is so awesome! Secondly, these people are not really over weight and lead active lifestyles. They do have postural issues and some low back pain. They have heard about Foundation Training and have seeked me out to help teach them to improve these issues which in turn keeps them moving well.
As I start with them I take a few pictures and just watch how they move. The one thing most everyone has in common is the inability to hinge at the hip. Foundation Training is all about re-learning how to use our hips for movement and support.. How have so many people forgotten to hinge at the hip? It’s just now people over 65 either….I have worked with much younger people who just bend over…no hinge happening at all! No wonder so many people have back pain.
The hip hinge is basically a shifting of weight back into the hip, glute, hamstring,calf and heel area. Why is this so difficult? One main reason is posterior chain weakness. Society sits to much! All this sitting on our glutei has made our posterior chain muscles short, tight and weak. So now, if you try to hinge at the hip… your brain let’s your knee or your quad know it better help the the hip out. Now your are hinging with the front of your body supporting you. This is so wrong and will create havoc in your knee, your back or both.

Look at the pictures below…an improper hinge…notice where the knees are. Look at he proper hinge…weight back over heels and the knee in line with the ankle…not in front of the toes.

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Learn FOUNDATION TRAING! Proper movement patterns, strength, flexibility and mobility are greatly going to improve your health and quality of life!

GET OFF YOUR GLUTES!

Tue 9/30/14:
The gluteus Maximus is more than a seat cushion. The gluteal muscles are very important muscles that need to be kept strong to perform everyday basic functions like raising from a chair, walking, running, lifting and stabilizing the pelvis. In today’s world where to many are sitting entirely to much…to many are walking around with weak glutei.

What Is the Role of Our Gluteus Maximus?
Today, the GM is important in many daily activities such as lifting, walking, and running. Its function in these activities includes helping to extend (or straighten) our hip to bring our thigh in line with our body, rotate our hip away from the center of our body, move our thigh away from and towards the center of our body, and stabilize our pelvis. It may also play a role in stabilizing our knee in extension.
During the task of lifting, for example, the GM plays an important role in the extension of our hips and stabilization of our pelvis. Functions of the GM during running include providing trunk stabilization and helping extend our hip on the stance side and decelerate our leg during the swing stage.
Weak GM muscles, therefore, compromise our ability to safely and effectively perform many of our daily activities. Weakness can cause difficulty with some of the movements that naturally require the GM, such as rising from the seated position, lifting, and walking and running. GM weakness may also be associated with—although not necessarily the cause of—lower back pain, hip and knee pain, and foot problems.

Foundation Training will wake your glutei up, activate them and strengthen them. The glutei muscle group is very important in the posterior chain and needs to be worked in unison with other posterior chain muscles such as the hamstrings. Foundation Training will balance out these muscles groups so they may work better together. So, stop sitting…stand up and do a Founder! Your glutei will take shape and feel better!

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