WHAT IS A POSTERIOR CHAIN?

Sat 2/6/15:
The POSTERIOR CHAIN is a group of muscles consisting predominantly of tendons and ligaments on the posterior of the body. Examples of these muscles include the biceps femoris, gluteus maximus, erector spinae muscle group, trapezius, and posterior deltoids.

The hard core truth is…this group of muscles are responsible for simple movement such as sitting and standing…to elite athletic movements. Take a look at some of the important muscles and what they do.
Multifidus (spine support)
Erector Spinae (back and spinal extension)
Gluteal Muscles (hip extensors, femoral rotation)
Hamstring Muscles (hip extension, knee flexion)
Gastrocnemius or Calf (plantar flexes ankle, knee flexion)
External Obliques (back and spine support, in tandem with anterior core)
Now think about the multitude of exercises and movements, in and out of the box, that rely upon these muscles (not to mention hip extension in general). It’s safe to say that the health of your posterior chain not only affects your athletic prowess—but your ability to move.
You do not need to know the names of these muscles and/or their actions. What you do need to know is:If you have back pain, tight muscles, poor posture, hump in the back, or lots of other postural issues learn FOUNDATION TRAINING!
FOUNDATION TRAINING directly addresses these posterior chain muscle groups. You can stand up again, your can re-learn better movement patterns, you can conquer back pain, and you can feel better.
FOUNDATION TRAINING is easy to learn and inexpensive. Just a little a day will keep back pain away.

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